As some of you know, I hold to the orthodox,albeit minority, view that lost souls are judged and then destroyed in hell at the judgment. Words like “destruction” “perish” and “death” mean just what they say, and we don’t have to do semantic gymnastics to make them mean something else. For awhile, I wondered why most believers didn’t see what I saw in scripture and believe in annihilation of the lost, too. 

But it has occurred to me that deep down, the vast majority of Christians must believe as I do. They talk as though hell exists, and they aren’t universalists. Perhaps they give lip service to the teaching of eternal conscious torment, but don’t really think it’s true. That must be the case, because there is no other way to explain their actions.
You see, if the vast majority of professing Christians actually believed that a large number of people hit hey know and live were headed for an eternity if conscious fiery torment in hell, there is no way anyone could keep them from telling everyone they know about salvation in Jesus Christ! We would spend whatever it cost, exert whatever effort we could, and travel to the ends of the earth to keep people from that horrible fate! 

Read this quote from Penn Jilette, who is an atheist.
“I’ve always said that I don’t respect people who don’t proselytize. I don’t respect that at all. If you believe that there’s a heaven and a hell, and people could be going to hell or not getting eternal life, and you think that it’s not really worth telling them this because it would make it socially awkward—and atheists who think people shouldn’t proselytize and who say just leave me along and keep your religion to yourself—how much do you have to hate somebody to not proselytize? How much do you have to hate somebody to believe everlasting life is possible and not tell them that?”

“I mean, if I believed, beyond the shadow of a doubt, that a truck was coming at you, and you didn’t believe that truck was bearing down on you, there is a certain point where I tackle you. And this is more important than that.”
Think about that. Even an atheist can see that an unwillingness to risk a socially awkward situation in or to tell someone about salvation is an act if hatred.

In 2012, a LifeWay survey found 80 percent of those who attend church one or more times a month believe they have a personal responsibility to share their faith, but 61 percenthave not told another person about how to become a Christian in the previous six months.
Since our actions reveal more thoroughly than anything else what we truly believe, the only logical conclusion I can come to is that about 61 percent of regular churchgoers, are either universalists who don’t believe in hell, Annihilationists like me who believe in eternal capital punishment (i.e. The Second Death), or are not really Christians at all because they hate billions of people. Whatever the case, it is obvious they don’t believe in eternal conscious torment. 
So which is it?

Advertisements